Canine Support Staff

Beowulf

Beowulf - Beowulf (pronounced “Bay-Wolf”) is the first of CAPS' Certified Therapy dogs. She is a loveable, Native American Indian Dog, which is a rare breed. Beowulf is in the office weekdays (except Fridays) with her handler, Dr. Colleen Duffy, and will often be on campus too. She loves meeting and working with Emory students! Beowulf was born on January 21, 2015 and weighs about 80 pounds.

Finn

Finn - Phineas (a.k.a. “Finn”) is Beowulf’s little brother. Finn and Beowulf are from different litters and he is two years younger (D.O.B. 2/12/2017). He received his Therapy Dog Certification like his big sister in in August, 2018. Finn is CAPS' “canine outreach specialist” and will attend special events on campus from time to time. He has congenital cataracts and may be eligible for surgery when he gets a little older to assist his vision. He loves to greet students and is incredibly social! Finn weighs about 100 pounds.

Dr. Colleen Duffy, Licensed Psychologist, is Beowulf & Finn’s Handler and Mom.

Follow Beowulf and Finn on social media! See where they'll pop up next!
Instagram: @beowulffinn_emoryCAPS
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BeowulfFinn/

Beowulf & Finn in the News:

Requests to have Finn or Beowulf Attend an Event

Due to overwhelming demand, Finn and Beowulf are only available for the pre-established events listed on our website.  If you have questions about meeting them, please contact the Associate Director of Outreach, Dr. Jane Yang at jyang01@emory.edu

Visit Finn!

Finn will be out and about on the following dates. Swing by to say hi!

Beowulf and Finn
Commonly Asked Questions


Beowulf & Finn are Native American Indian Dogs and have the same parents. This is a rare breed totaling about 1,000 dogs. Beowulf was born on January 21, 2015, and Finn was born on February 12, 2017. They have hair (rather than fur) and shed about once a year so, as a result, they have less dander than many other breeds (* see footnote).

*The American Kennel Club’s website: “According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, as much as 10% of the U.S. population is allergic to dogs. While no dog is 100% hypoallergenic, there are many breeds that do well with allergy sufferers. Dander, which is attached to pet hair, is what causes most pet allergies in humans and these dogs have a non-shedding coat that produces less dander.” 

Please ask the handler, Dr. Colleen Duffy, first. But as a general plan – yes, absolutely! They have been trained to listen to their handler for instructions when greeting new people. Finn is more outgoing and really enjoys meeting new people. Beowulf likes a little more time to get to know you and she will be asked by her handler to move towards you to say hello.
Service dogs are utilized by one person to provide support and perform tasks for one individual with a specific disability. By contrast, therapy dogs are trained for multiple settings to provide support and comfort to many individuals.
Dr. Duffy introduced the idea of a therapy dog for CAPS after witnessing how beneficial service dogs can be in providing greater autonomy and freedom for persons with various disabilities. She became interested in the idea of how one dog could benefit multiple people. Finn became CAPS second therapy dog when his medical conditions including congenital cataracts prohibited him from becoming a service dog.
Beowulf works with Dr. Duffy as an Animal Assisted Therapy Dog. Many students find Beowulf to be a comforting and soothing presence. Petting Beowulf during session can help reduce stress and anxiety, soothe feelings of loss or sadness, or help when discussing something painful and upsetting. Finn serves as a great ambassador for CAPS outside of the office as part of CAPS’ outreach initiatives for the larger campus community.
The Therapy Dog Certification process is quite rigorous for the dog and handler. Beowulf and Dr. Duffy received their Therapy Dog Certification during the summer of 2016. Finn and Dr. Duffy received their Therapy Dog Certification during the summer of 2018.